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Friday, 31 January 2014

Diagram - VMware vCloud Director Cell Architecture

This diagram illustrates the vCloud Director cell architecture:

Note: A PDF version of this diagram has also been attached to this article.





Attachments

Source:-
http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=1030954

VMware vCloud Director network ports diagram

This diagram shows the relationships of the VMware vCloud Director Network Ports:
Note: A PDF version of this diagram has also been attached to this article.



Attachments



Source:-
http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=1030816

Wednesday, 29 January 2014

Creating network pools in VMware vCloud Director (1026300)

Purpose

This article provides:
  • Information about the network pools available in VMware vCloud Director
  • Steps to create a network pool

Resolution

 
To create Organization Networks or vApp Networks, a pool of network resources must be available. These network pools must be created in advance of the creation of Org and vApp networks. If they do not exist, the only network option available to an organization is the direct connect to the provider network.

Network pools can be one of these types:
  • VLAN-backed – a range of VLAN IDs and a vNetwork distributed switch are available in vSphere. The VLAN IDs must be valid IDs that are configured in the physical switch to which the ESX/ESXi servers are connected.
  • vCloud isolated networks – An isolation-backed network pool does not require pre-existing port groups in vSphere but needs a vSphere vNetwork distributed switch. It uses portgroups which are dynamically created. A Cloud isolated network spans hosts, provides traffic isolation from other networks and is the best source for vApp networks.
  • vSphere port groups – Unlike other types of network pools, a network pool that is backed by port groups does not require a vNetwork distributed switch. This is the only type of network pool that works with Cisco Nexus 1000V virtual switches.
  • vCloud Director 5.1 introduces VXLAN, which provides the capability to create isolated, multi-tenant domains across data center fabrics. For more information, see the:
The network traffic on each network of a network pool is isolated at Layer 2 from all other network traffic. The VMware vCloud Director Network Isolation networks span hosts and are represented as portgroups on a vNetwork Distributed Switch.
 
Individual vCloud Director Network Isolated Networks are isolated from each other. They are enabled via an agent (vslad) running on each host that is participating in the network by opening a network tunnel. This is similar to the network isolation technology used in Lab Manager. However, isolation in vCloud Director is done with an ESX daemon alone and does not rely on Service virtual machines like Lab Manager.
To create a VLAN-backed network pool:
  1. Create a Provider Network. For more information, see Creating External (Provider) Networks in VMware vCloud Director (1026299).
  2. Click the Manage & Monitor tab, then click Network Pools (in the left pane).
  3. Click Add Network Pool.
  4. Select VLAN-backed and click Next.
  5. Type a range of VLAN IDs and click Add.

    Note: You can create one network for each VLAN ID.
  6. Select a vCenter Server and vNetwork distributed switch and click Next.
  7. Type a name and optional description for the network and click Next.
  8. Review the network pool settings and click Finish.
To create a vCloud isolated network:
  1. Create a Provider Network. For more information, see Creating External (Provider) Networks in VMware vCloud Director (1026299).
  2. Click the Manage & Monitor tab, then click Network Pools (in the left pane).
  3. Click Add Network Pool.
  4. Select VCD Network Isolation-backed and click Next.
  5. Type the number of networks to create from the network pool.
  6. (Optional) Type a VLAN ID.
  7. Select a vCenter Server and a vNetwork distributed switch and click Next.
  8. Type a name and optional description for the network and click Next.
  9. Review the network pool settings and click Finish.

    Note: Cloud Director creates vCloud isolated networks in vSphere as they are needed.
To create vSphere Port Groups:
  1. Create a Provider Network. For more information, see Creating External (Provider) Networks in VMware vCloud Director (1026299).
  2. Click the Manage & Monitor tab, and click Network Pools (in the left pane).
  3. Click Add Network Pool.
  4. Select vSphere Port Group-backed and click Next.
  5. Select a vCenter Server and click Next.
  6. Select one or more port groups, click Add > Next.

    Note: You can create one network for each port group.
  7. Type a name and optional description for the network and click Next.
  8. Review the network pool settings and click Finish.
Source:-
http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=1026300

vCloud Director 5.1 Configuration Maximums (2036392)

Details

The limits presented in the following table represent tested, recommended limits for a vCloud Director 5.1 installation (single cell or multi-cell), and they are fully supported by VMware. To scale beyond these numbers, you will need to install an additional instance of vCloud Director 5.1. Please note that you cannot achieve the maximums in all categories at the same time, so make sure to understand how the limits apply to your use cases.

Solution

Category
Maximum
Total Virtual Machines
30,000
Powered-on Virtual Machines
10,000
Total vApps
30,000
Virtual Machines per vApp
128
ESX/i Hosts
2,000
vCenter Servers
25
vCloud Director Cells
10
Total Users
10,000
Concurrent Users
1,500
Logged-in Users
5,000
Total Organizations
10,000
Users per Organization
1,000
vApps per Organization
3,000
Virtual Datacenters (VDCs)
10,000
Resource Pools per VDC
32
Datastores
1,000
Concurrent Virtual Machine Consoles
500
Logical Networks
10,000
vApp Networks
1,000
External Networks
512
Isolated VDC Networks
2,000
Direct VDC Networks
10,000
Routed VDC Networks
2,000
Gateways
1,000
Network Pools
40
Catalogs
10,000
Media
1,000
Independent Disks
1,000
Storage Classes
50
Storage Pods
100

vCloud Networking and Security 5.1 Edge configuration limits and throughput(2042799)


Purpose

This article provides information about the configuration limits and performance metrics of the vCloud Networking and Security 5.1 Edge – compact, large, and x-large versions. You can use this information to make a deployment choice for Edge instances.

Resolution

Details of Edge instances used in performance metrics comparison

Edge (Compact)Edge (Large)Edge (X-Large)
vCPU122
Memory256 MB1 GB8 GB
Disk320 MB320 MB4.4 GB

 

Tested Limits

The following table provides information on the tested soft limits per vCloud Networking and Security Manager:
 
Note: These soft limits can be exceeded on a per feature basis depending on the resources and the set of features in use.
 
LimitvCloud Networking and Security Manager
Number of Edge HA appliances2,000 Compact / Large Edges or 1,000 X-Large Edges
Number of clusters8
Number of hosts with Edge in use256 (8 clusters * 32 hosts)
Number of hosts in inventory400
Number of virtual machines15000 total virtual machines, 5000 powered on
Number of networks5000 VXLANs
Number of firewall rules100,000
Number of firewall object groups130,000
Number of DHCP static bindings25,000
Number of DHCP pools10,000
Number of static routes100,000
Number of load balancer pools3,000
Number of load balancer virtual servers3,000
Number of members in load balancer pools30,000
 
 
The following table provides information on the tested soft limits per vCloud Networking and Security Edge:
 
LimitvCloud Networking and Security Edge
Number of interfaces10
Number of firewall rules2,000
Number of NAT rules2,000
Number of DHCP static bindings25
Number of DHCP pools10
Number of static routes100
Number of load balancer pools3 (Hard limit: 64)
Number of load balancer virtual servers3 (Hard limit: 64)
Number of members per load balancer pool10 (Hard limit: 32)
Concurrent IPSec VPN Tunnels64
Concurrent SSL VPN Tunnels25 (Compact), 100 (Large)

 

Firewall and VPN Performance Comparison

Edge (Compact)Edge (Large)
Firewall Performance (Gbps)39.7
Concurrent Sessions64,0001,000,000
New sessions/second8,00050,000
IPSec VPN throughput (Gbps) - H/W acceleration via AESNI0.92

 

Load Balancer Performance Comparison

Edge (Large)Edge (X-Large)
Load balancer throughput – L7 Proxy Mode (Gbps)2.23
Load balancer connections / sec – L7 Proxy Mode46,00050,000
Load balancer concurrent connections – L7 Proxy Mode8,00060,000
Load balancer throughput – L4 Mode (Gbps)66
Load balancer connections / sec – L4 Mode50,00050,000
Load balancer concurrent connections – L4 Mode600,0001,000,000
 
Notes:
  • VMware recommends you to use Edge (Large) or Edge (X-Large) for load balancing
  • Edge (X-Large) is not available in the vCloud Director deployment

Test Server Configuration

  • Dell PowerEdge T610 with ESXi 5.1
  • CPU – 8 CPUs x 2.393 GHz Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5620
  • Memory – 24 GB
  • Network – 2x Intel 82599EB 10-gigabit SFI/SFP+

Test Methodology

  • IXIA IX Chariot applications used for throughput, connections per second, and concurrent connections tests.
  • Throughput measured with 1500 byte TCP frame size.
  • Throughput measured with accept any to any firewall rule and no additional NAT rules.
  • Load balancer performance numbers are for HTTP traffic.
  • Feature performance quoted is independent of other features. For example, firewall throughput measured without load balancer or other services enabled.
Source:-
http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=2042799